For Each and All: America's Constitution and the Antislavery Movement

Published by Heritage Museum

Wednesday 21st of August 2019

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

The Heritage Museum and Cultural Center, 601 Main St. St. Joseph, MI 49085

2019-08-21 18:30:00 2019-08-21 19:30:00 America/Detroit For Each and All: America's Constitution and the Antislavery Movement Please join us as Dr. Christopher Momany explores antebellum America and the abolitionist movement, detailing the influence of Asa Mahan - an antislavery advocate, theologian, and president of Oberlin and Adrian Colleges. The Heritage Museum and Cultural Center, 601 Main St. St. Joseph, MI 49085 Heritage Museum

Today most scholars agree that before the Civil War the United States Constitution allowed and perhaps even protected slavery. The majority in antebellum America, both North and South, also held this view. Yet a vocal minority believed that the Constitution was a charter for political action against slavery. Frederick Douglass came to this conviction, and later Martin Luther King, Jr. worked from the same tradition. Lesser known abolitionists before the Civil war - some from Michigan - laid the foundation for this intepretation. Essential to this movement was an answer to the question: Who is meant by "We the People?" How are the agency, participation, and the voice of each and all necessary for creating the republic set in motion by our founders? Dr. Christopher Momany brings this fascinating and often overlooked story to life and points to its relevance for our time.